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Presentations Advanced Learning Resources

Presentation Skills Advanced - Presenting Powerfully Learning Resources

Let's get learning!  Get more out of your course with these learning resources from TP3.

Before the course

Want to get the most out of this experience? To prepare for your Presenting Powerfully course, please complete these four activities:

1.    Prepare for your videotaped presentation delivery

At the course, you will deliver two videotaped presentations - you can’t learn great presentation skills just by listening to theory! So before you come along, plan two presentations using these scenarios. Please spend no more than 10mins preparing for each scenario (Max 20mins prep):

  1. Scenario: You have been invited to deliver a 3 minute presentation to another division in the organisation. The purpose of your presentation is to encourage cross-functional relationships within your company and to communicate what your area of the business is responsible for. The theme of your presentation is “a day in the life” of your job.
  2. Scenario: Prepare a 3 minute presentation designed to motivate a client to agree to do business with your company. Plan a presentation that hooks them in, has 3 key reasons why they should work with your organisation and a strong powerful close, with a good call to action.

The videotape will only be used to review your performance on the day and your audience (other participants) will provide you with feedback on your presentation techniques. This is a valuable learning opportunity – the insights you will get from these activities will be priceless.

2.    Watch one of these videos

Title Description
Sarah Key, TEDTalk 2011, “If I should have a daughter" This video is a fantastic example of a presenter who uses body language, emotion and powerful delivery techniques to captivate her audience – well worth the standing ovation at the end.
Brené Brown TEDTalk 2010 -  “The power of vulnerability" This is one of the most watched presentations in the history of TED talks – Brené is engaging, articulate and inspiring and a wonderful example of powerful presenting in action.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.    Read one of these articles:

4.    Consider what you want to achieve by attending the course and write your goals down.

 

After the Course: Your Embed the Learning Kit

The task of embedding your learning into your day-to-day actions comes next. These activities will help you stay focused so you can consolidate your skills.

1.    Use your Quick Reference Guide

Use this TP3 Presentation Skills Advanced quick reference guide

2.    Review your Improvement Plan in your Learner Guide

Are you doing what you said you would do? Are you practicing your skills and making changes?

3.    Watch more great presentations

Identify the styles and delivery techniques you can apply to your presentations. TED Talks is a fantastic online resource for watching different presentations – while learning new things! Check out:

  • Jamie Oliver: Teach every child about food
  • Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are
  • Sir Ken Robinson: School kills creativity
  • James Cameron: Before Avatar: A curious boy
  • Alain De Botton: A kinder, gentler kind of philosophy of success
  • Dan Gilbert: The surprising science of happiness

4.    Ask others for feedback on your presentations

Review your performance each time you present for what you did well and what you could do differently. Ask your manager, colleagues or audience members for feedback on your presentations and any improvements they have noticed.

Other ideas (if you're really keen):

  • Join associations for public speaking such as National Speakers Association of Australia
  • Find a presentation mentor – choose someone who is an exceptional presenter and organise time to discuss your presentation concerns or ideas with them.
  • Review websites that have articles and information on presentation skills such as:
    • Presentation magazine
    • Mind tools

The Next Step

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